006 - What Happens at a Writer's Retreat... STAYS at a Writer's Retreat!
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The Writer's Retreat
The Writer's Retreat

Episode 6 · 2 years ago

006 - What Happens at a Writer's Retreat... STAYS at a Writer's Retreat!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You just never know what you'll learn from attending a Writer's Retreat. And that's why we invited bestseller and international guest author Carolyn R. Parsons to tell us all about her most recent retreat experience! 

Yeah, Take Your Bra off, take the pants off, fifty shades of gray, whatever you want. Hello and welcome to a podcast all about writing with writers Leah Mac Leslie Roots. This is the writer's retreat. So welcome back to the right as retreat. Thank you for joining us our fit episode. We are your host writers, leam Mac and Leslie Road. So glad you're here today. I missed here. That's been a total of seven days twenty four hours since you got as a disclaimer to anyone listening or watching, because we're live on faceboff, Leslie's in my bubbles, we make sure that we quarantine severally and like we're okay to be in the same rooms. Yes, yes, like my one and only friend of you ever see. So it's important that we say that. Yes, yes, she wore a mask over my house the first day. Yes, you had bicycles on it. Yeah, so what are you going to talk about, Leah? Well, Leslie, I thought it would be fun to invite an international guest Aufer for Jase and she's gonna give us a lesson on how to pronounce where she's from. Okay, because obviously we're Americans, that is pronounced everything. Carolyn our Parsons is our guest today and she is a full time writer and community activists residing up in what we call Newfoundland. I'm not sure if we're saying it right, but Newfoundland and Labrador Canada. I see her shaking her books and the Green novels and a collection of short stories. Her novel Charlie, through Canada, attained best seller status on Amazon. I know we have a best sellery here in our men and her most recent novel, the Forbidden Dreams of Betsy Elliott, was published by Flanker and received a Canada Book of war. So please welcome Carolyn Y. Thank you. Thank you. It's great to be here. So it's Newfoundland, Newfoundland. So how you remember is go do this little sentence. Understand Newfoundland. Americans only saying things, I think. I think that happens. So when you only read it and you don't hear it said, you kind of the phonetics is not there until you hear the words right. And not just America's Canadians from not from Newfoundland, will do the same thing sometimes. So where is Newfoundland? Where is it? East? West? It's east. It's the very most eastern province of Canada. So it's Newfouland and Labrador is the name of the province and I'm on the island which is Newfoundland, and I've seen so many beautiful pictures over the years. I've known Carolyn for, I would have to say, set about fifteen years, I'd say at least. You're one of my best facebook friends that I've never met. I want to hear more about how. How is this possible? Well, she listen, Canada what so Leslie was asking how we've known each other for so long and never actually seen each other. Well, we met on website called MOTHERINGCOM and they had a forum and we met in the Writers Section of the Forum and we got eventually got kicked off, not just us two, but all writers. They didn't like doing promo and stuff. And Yeah, they close it down. That's all I know. They really yeah, and I don't know. We were on a lot of different forms, but that was where we met. Yeah, they should have never closed it down, because who do you think is was active on a forum? Writer? Yeah, writers, they write, they provide free content. That's likely they love. So, Carolyn, why don't you tell us a little bit more about yourself? When on a writer's retreat at the end of the summer. And for this retreat, in advance of it, we had to send in a short story that was no more than two hundred words and the the person who was facilitating the retreat, would edit the stories and then we had to rewrite them and send them back. So then they were judged to be read. Three of them would be picked be read on the Saturday night at an event, a show, and the person who was hosting workshop, facilitator was actually my editor for bets, the Elliott all right, and she is a net and Canadian, nationally best selling author and she's been...

...writing for years and she's from this province. She lives in Halifax in Nova Scotia now, but she's originally from Newfounland. So she came down and did the thing is she was fantastic. She was an amaze. She writes historical fiction, so she was perfect for this project and all the things that I knew, like when you when you send it in, you know how you have in your mind. I know what I want to do, but I know I'm not quite there, but I don't know how to get there. And that's where I really experienced editor and writer can you know, and I you know. So she really she inspired and she's really good at getting you to think about what you're writing, and so she was fantastic editor. But I never met her and when I found out she was hosting this retreat on the West Coast and I hadn't at any vacation, I'lls you know. And we have the Atlantic bubble. We're in like the safest place on earth right now, just because it's been so strict here that we have in our province, I think we right now we have four cases, no, six, wow, six. So our government's been really really it was strict, but because it's been strict, we actually have more freedom now. Right the retreat we were at, I was like we and it was right after the mandatory mask came in. So we had when we went out for dinner, we had to wear the mask until you're seated at your table and and I got to the doornament, I've forcoming mask and lady had one in her purse over the girls. So she gave me your extra. I had a wonder woman mass. It was great and I like yeah, so this is why you were able to go to retreat, because everything so say so that was my vacation. So and the girls are old enough now. I finally like they're fifteen and seventeen, so I could leave them and it was four hour drive and it's on the west coast of the island and the West Coast as the mountains in the ocean and it's it's a different so there's this really nifty community that's teeny tiny, like it's a few hundred people and but it is a literary hub and they have festival there every year. Writers from Canada will be there reading performing. You know, they have musical things and stuff too, but it's this big festival. Course I got canceled due to the pandemic. So a local resident who runs, you know, accommodations there for star accommodation. They would gorgeous, decided maybe that they could do this retreat and Donna was coming from Nova Scotia Anyway, so they were that's the facilitator, and so they put together a retreat and it was absolutely fantastic. So we submitted our stories and then we went over and we went Thursday we went and then we were there and we came back Sunday. Beautiful Room. You know, it was it was pricing, but it was an investment. Right, right, exactly. That's what the thing is like. It's an investment in your writing career. It really is, and I think you know, it's also a holiday retreat. Yeah, it was truly a vacation, you know, like I mean, especially with all that's been going on, the stress of it and you know, the and it was just me. It's like a break for me away from people. The kids had a great time while I was gone, like they could hang out and get me out of the house for a while. So heppy great, and my husband it works up in none of it. Talk about north. He's up in the Arctic. Say That again. Where is he? NONEAVUT, univer it, none of it is one of the three territories of Canada, three northern territories. Canada's ten provinces and three norm you know, Puerto Rico is a right, yeah, ritory of the US. So we have three territories. They're much bigger land wise, and one of them is nunavut, which is eastern north and I mean I'm talking. It's in the Arctic, it's Baffin Island, it's way up there and that's very yeah, my husband works on Baffin island in an iron mine. That was my cat. Sorry, they're all printed something today. There is no way to do a zoom call with a cat in the...

...house and not have the cat be part of it. It's just I know exactly. It's a rule. So so he's up there. So you know, it was nice for me to just take off for the full long weekend and I just and they provided breakfast and lunch and it was just beautified. A king size bed and water flow. Yeah, and the room was so quiet like because it was so soundproofd so just sleet ocean view. It's up high and then you look down and there's all these mountains and ocean. It's the mountains called Gross Morn and it's just spectacular and they're in the valley right. So it's really nice. You're able to a lot of writing done. We didn't. I didn't do a lot of writing. That's the thing. I didn't do a lot of writing while I was there except for what we were working on. But it was what I brought back. I was remotivated and and just inspired. And then I had a four hour drive back. So I'm the drive back my mind just going and inspired and you know. But what was really good about is we spend a lot of time. We were all writers and so just hanging out with writers is, you know, a big part of it's a solitary Gig, right, and and then you sit around, you think you're aft nuts with all these make it up stories. I'll grow and woman make it up stories. And then, you know, you hang it with these authors and it's just like completely normal to make up stories like that's just like yeah, yeah, and so you know, you get that sort of I don't know, like my and we were all at different levels. There were total beginners and there, you know, and then there were people who had, you know, published, and there was one person there who was is an actor who wants to write more fiction. Yeah, written stuff, she writes. Obviously she might her own work, but and she's very well known in the province. So if she was fantastic. So so then they sent our stories to be judged while we did the workshop that was happening. The heart of the story, like finding out what really the story is about so that you can, you know, dig right down to the essence of it and then you can get rid of the stuff that don't serve that essence. And so there's things like that which can apply to a short story or a poem or anything like. What are we writing about here? And so I guess it would come down to a theme and in a sense. And then there were a lot of fun exercises. There was one exercise that was a riot. We had to so she would describe something like really, you find out your partner's having an affair. So she would do the scenario right and you sit there going like, oh, yeah, I would kill him or something, you know. So you to get us into the emotion. And then should give us a very simple thing like, okay, you're looking at a building and you're really you really have a crush on this guy, like you really really have a total crush on this guy. You should use this in your retreats, by the way, this was so fun. And you really really like the phone rings and the ASS shout for date and you're like now you're pitture a building in your mind, just any building that you could come off the top of your head right and right about that building from that point of view. So of course we're a bunch of us in the room and we're all adults. So it got really the sky straper was really tall and it round empire set and I was thinking about small little bread and see, I don't know, I don't know, I don't go that. We did that and then we read them and then we went back to okay, now he calls and he cancels, or you're at the place and he doesn't show up or whatever, and like it's like and now it's over, like oh now your piss so then you had to write the same thing but from that emotion. So yeah, the skyscraper,...

...you know, wasn't as big as originally thought. Didn't last right long, I don't know, but anyway, it was hilarious. It was such a fun thing to do. But it really showed that the emotional you can have an emotional impact on your on your work, right just by thinking and getting in that place and then writing from that right. But yeah, there were a lot of fun exercises like that and some of them are more serious and you know, people wrote actual, real moving things that had happened. And but the level of talent was amazing. Everybody there was a writer, I mean everybody there. At the opportunity and the the talent to do something if they if they decided to do something with it. I think every story that came out of it was certainly publishable and and of course Donna helped by pointing things out. And so then we did the show. We were told who story would be read would get to read their story and then this Saturday afternoon everybody else was free to what they wanted and the ones who were going to read that night had a lesson in sort of how to present your story. So we were re rewriting for and this. This was probably the most valuable thing I learned was how that when you do a book reading, you don't have to read verbatim from the book. Ah, that you and it's like I'm reading in a whole in terror chapter. This chapters twenty five pages long. I cannot believe I'm reading this whole thing. In fact, she would write a version that was packaged for the live audience and not really read the book, because she said she's had people say to her I was reading a long I couldn't find that part. It's like it's not in the book, but it doesn't have to be. You're you're promoting your book and you're telling the story, but you want to give the audience, it's a show, something that's, you know, a package for that. So it's a different thing than reading from a book and only get the chapter and everything. So she really encourage and I'm like, I didn't even think of that. I'm trying to find not give away spoilers and you know, you don't have to give its wonders because you can take out sections. She said. I've taken out characters that have a scene because it was mostly about two people, but I had a third person just because it served the bigger story, but it didn't serve the smaller audience. Okay, thing, and I've taken out that end. And I'm like yeah, that makes sense, because I found it really hard to find good because this book, if you're remember, it's like you don't go very far and something's happening and it's like leads to the next thing and the next thing it's a drama. You just yeah, you have to, yeah, read the whole thing. So I learned that was very, very valuable. I thought that for me, that was the most valuable piece because it was a piece that I didn't really have and but it was all fun and it was all interesting and I think, I don't think you could ever stop learning new things about writing. So, like you said, it's an investment, like going to writers and treat you might be pricey, might but it might be just a one once in a lifetime opportunity. It's like this. It's pricey, but in a year from now I won't say, Oh, if I had not spent that money on that thing, I could do what? Yeah, there's nothing that I will miss it for. I mean, if you're if you it's don't take your rent money and do it. But you know, if you can afford it, it's one thing that's a priority. If you're, if you're going to investment yet in your writing career, are our priority. Yeah, exactly. And even if you don't, it's still, if you do it and it's something that just feeds you, I'm still worth investing, because there's nothing more worth investing than you right that either way, it's it's you know, it's like if you paint and you just love it, you're never going to sell a painting, but you just love painting, you still you could probably take some lessons and do some drings and you know, yeah, so what had some yeah, it's...

...a part of your craft and it's a part of your I don't know, the inspirational piece of it is huge. You know it like we went through this whole pandemic. What if you did not have writing as a tool? Would if, like, you had no way of being creative or expressing yourself? I mean this is writing is just an amazing tool to release whatever emotions you have. I mean, whatever it is, it could be a story, of poem, a song, a paragraph, a bullet point. You know, it's I think we have a think creativity and however it comes out, is all about US having a desire to tell our stories, to be heard, to have a voice and to be heard row or however we choose to make sense of the world around us, whether it's through painting or photography or whatever that is. But during the pandemic, everybody was a writer, because there was nobody who wasn't on social media. Well, that's expressing and writing. Yeah, what they were going through and what they thought of the whole thing. And whether you agree or disagree, or or you think social media is bad or good or whatever, it really is full of writers. Like people are writing to make sense of what the world around them. And it's a great big it's a platform and it's a great big library of our time. You know, like how you describe it. I think the pandemic to journal every day or once a week or once a month what's going on is a historical itself. You know, you leave it to your kid. Is Historical what is going on right now and that we're living through it and to document it by writing it is just I think it's phenomenal. I mean the situation is not no, but being able to write it about it and going back and having they're gonna write. There's this in the future. Absolutely. I I write historical fiction and when and so I do a lot of research and when I read about those times and what they were like and when they live through the wars, and the best stories, I think, are the ones about regular people in historic times, like, you know, the kings and Queens and the dukes and Duchess as. Yeah, now I want to read about the people who were living in tenements in London during the blitz, like I want the real family that you know, went into the tube to get away from the bombs and the Tube, you know, the water main broken, they drown like those stories are, you know, the ones that I find that are like you know. And then you have the orphans and the people that were left behind. They live through these times and but I love right reading about those historical times. And now we're living. We're always living in history, but right now it is a time that they write books about. It's turb it's turbulent. You can write books in the US right now. You could write books about Tuesday. It's like every day is a freaking novel. Like Yesday. It's I just ignore it and work at my novel because I'm more interested in what I have to write. If someone wrote it, if someone wrote it and said it was fiction, nobody believe it. They said that was the most far fetual, ridiculous thing that you should ever bring to a question. Said something about literary versus John. Yes, like to talk about what does that mean, just because recently this is come up in so I work with the local writers alliance and because I work with the writer's Alliance for the province, I'm on the board. A lot of our writers are sort of in one category or another. So genre writers tend to write genre fiction. So Genre would be romance and all the subgenres and Scifi, you know, any of the specular fiction. It's plot driven,...

...it's storage, like you go through action and and character development, and the literary tends to be more about the craft of writing, the a doct you drama, versus a gray's anatomy? Yeah, like grays an atomy is very plot driven, right, like something's always happening. Like when I was writing this, it was going to be a drama. That was my model, even though there's nothing about that in there. My model was to keep the action going, like every time it seems to get a little slow, something new must happen. And you know I'm always throwing a bomb in the room right because I want to see how my characters are going to react to the next thing, which is very much a genre thing. And historical fiction, I guess, is a genre. But within that you may have a historical fiction. That is what we call literary fiction. It doesn't fit easily in one of those slots. I would think your book, Leah, is a literary fiction. It would fall into that categactoring more this book here. Yeah, that one did for that and that get there. For those of you listen to the PODCAST and not watching on facebook. It's a huge life size poster of my first novel, which I'm looking at thinking that's what I need to do, like a waiting for pain to drive literary because it doesn't fit into a genre. It does end. I mean you can genre and you can fit anything into a box. I mean you could call it women's fiction, right, right, which I don't particularly care for because I think that men should read books like that. Yeah, I don't think it should be. It's about a woman, but I've read books about men. So what's the difference? And tons of tons of men I've read this book. Tons this is I've seen the reviews and yeah, I'll remember a lot. I had an email from a guy the other day and he's like, I just finished reading it and it was amazing. He loved it. So there is that sort of women. You never get men's fiction, you know what I mean. But people will separate out into women's fish and the one I really hate, which is chicklet, like like the what marketing? I mean it's about marketing and it really is about marketing and it's based on people's you know, and I'm a marketer by nature. I mean Im background is in business and communication and marketing and like. It's all part of business. So I see that piece of it. And so that's why I don't get upset when people because people will disparage genre or people will dispays Litera. They will say literally, is all boring and highbrow and you know, and seanres just, you know, fun stuff and fluff. So there's there's, you know, people who do judge them. I love them both. I read anything that. Sometimes I read what they would call very light reading that I just want to escape into some you know, I don't want to think too much and I just want to go into some escapisms like TV. You know, sometimes you're going to watch some really serious, you know, sixty minutes a thing, and the next time you're going to watch something on Netflix. Yeah, I have not been going to bed on time because of married at first sight. Else Relia. Oh, I I pretty much got that down. Yeah, I just, you know, whatever suits the the moment. And my books. If someone came looked at my bookshelf, there's no rhyme or reason to them. Like there's no what do you like to read? While there? They all are, all those different things. You know, it's it's everything, and I I'm not a snob of anything. I think if anybody's writing and publishing work, there's a place for it. HMM. Yeah, because most of these literary fictions are kind of experimental. You're not sure right, okay, well then now I need to read Queery, my book,...

...because it was experimental literary. Yeah, well, that's what it is, you know, and some people take some really big risks and the publishers like look at it and go, I don't know if we'd sell many of these. It's not, you know, for the big audience, especially regional stuff, and but they could afford to do it because they have done well with the some other big sellers. So like fifty shades of gray, which is financed a lot of literary fiction. Yeah, so people should not. So I guess my thing is nobody should look down their nose at anybody's writing, because it all has its place. Like that email. I for you that author willow winters. It's that same job. It's the same if she's doing yeah, well, I could write that. Yeah, anybody care imaginations very little. What do you do it in there? Hunting research. That's when you delete your history every day. Yeah, have an ETO window exactly. So you have a lot going on with the writing community around where you live. I started a writing group here. We used to get together one time and even since the pandemic we've gotten together a couple of times over zoom just to touch base and talk right and we it's very informal. Sometimes we write, sometimes we read our things, sometimes we just talked about a topic. But and it's always different people coming and going because, well, I'm in a really rural place, so they come from different communities near me and we gather at the house, have a chat and read our stuff and it keeps us fun. It is fun. It's just a way to I don't know, we find the writers, you know, and get them, get them. The juice is flowing and it works because when they feel like they're coming to a writers they have to present something. In a month they do something, you know, bloggers and poets and writers, people who have finished novels that they're, you know, trying to get published, and it's just a whole mix of people and it's been it's been fun. So I started doing that night, just get involved and do what I can to help support the writing community because I think it's a underserved and in some cases people just don't know what's here, like what, what? What the what to do? If they're right, we're to take the things who descend it to how it's the writing and and we're full of stories, like it's a very we have a very unique history. You know, we have stories around every band of some strange thing that never happened anywhere else in the world because they don't have our culture. You know, stories that would be along the lines of have you read where the crowded saying like very regional type things that you could only write here, right. So that kind of unique which I really like. That book, by the way, I was a wonderful book. It was a great book and I love the ending. That's the kind of thing I write. I Like I've written that would be a literary fiction. Yeah, because of the type of pros it is. It's not. It's not. It's unique and it's very well written, but it's also very plot R of it. There's a lot of things happening in that book and and so that's the one that sort of really tows the line in there and I just love it. But you couldn't slot it into a genre. No, it was such a good book that I wanted to find out more about her, the authors. I look there's great interviews you can look up on Youtube and stuff like that about her and the story behind it, her research, and she's great. Yeah, you know, it's fantastic book, but yeah,...

...like you're saying, you know, writers are very it's a very solitary, you know, craft and to be able to have a writing community that you can go to and it's a safe place, right. It's not a huge expense to go to someone's house. It's not a writing retreat, but you know, to like once someone go to a writers group and learn about the craft of writing, because you, like you said, we all have these stories in us, especially like in very distinctive locals, and being able to afford your offer of that type of service to your to the people around you. That's I think that's great. I think as an Adultso helps with your own writing because, no matter what, we're all at different levels, we're all at different places. But I always learn from I don't from people that I you know, this is the first thing they've ever written and they wrote like Oh, I should write it like that, read something like that. You just always are learning from the world around you, I guess, and that would include the people that are writing around you so well, I just don't know. I'm having a hard time with my novel. Sometimes I don't feel connected to it because I'm planning so much of not just sit writing from the scene my pants, which always makes you feel very connected and like I can hear the characters, but this way I have to Shush my characters so I can plan it out logically and then talk again. So this is a totally different way of so you of your plotting. Now I owe I'm plotting like a plotter never plotted it's so as you read this one, take your pants off, outline your books be faster and better. No, I've never even seen that. Okay, so I'm worry nowadays. So yeah, take your bro off, take the pants off, fifty shades of gray, whatever you want. But I both in I'm hybrid, I guess. I've published your publishers and I've published independently, and I have spent a lot of time in the indie world online, just because just writing stuff, but also the marketing end, because I don't believe that's a hundred percent your publishers responsibility. Even a big publishers don't do it anymore. No, I think you know, writers are the best advocates for the wrong books. I mean they always will be. It is so because of that. I've always and also I have a really broad interest, like I've I'm writing something, I'm planning, I'm plotting, I'm outlining a series that will be in independently published series and I don't and I don't know when, and it'll be under a pen name. But it's just a project that I wanted to do. It's a why, a project that I've wanted to do for a while. It's a time travel thing. So it's got that element which is told everything, all this new stuff that I've never done before. I love that stuff. I don't read a lot of it, but I love it on tell like I love I was tracky. I love time travel stuff. I love science fiction stuff. I'm not interested in the science piece. I'm interested in how the people react to the new things that they encounter. So with time travel, the time travel that I'm doing is is sort of opposite. It's someone from the past who comes to now and has to deal with where we are now, coming from three World War One, pre one. So they're just jumping right from one thousand eight hundred and eighty nine to two thousand and eighteen or so. I'm before the pandemic. And so I'm my plan is to outline all these books. I want to have detailed outlines before I write them. And that makes sense because it's a series. It's a series. I'm not doing that with betsy and that's a series. I just have kind of a vague idea that they're going to take place in different places. What made you want to do an outline for this one? I wanted to see what was better, the easier, because exactly why I did it? Because because I only...

...is right. I don't plan it very much. I don't plan as much and even when I plan, a veer and that seemed like I have to go back and rewrite a bunch of stuff because I've, you know, gone a different way. And so that's all fine, but I just thought I want to try this another way. And so and and I can write. I can get a lot of work done. I can write like I mean, I drafted Charlie through Canada in sixteen days. I had. You know, I had one day where I wrote Twentyzero words. Wow, because it's for a loan. I can't markle tunnel. I have carpal's Donnel and I actually had to take a period. I had about six weeks one time when I had to where I couldn't type it off. But get well I wanted. It was a special project. It was written prior to the summer of the Canada one hundred and fifty, Canada's one hundred and fifty birthday, so it was very much a marketing thing. I wanted to get it out and published and it was all about Canna. Was Super so sad. It was fun, it was silly, it was tongue in cheek. It was like all the Canadian there was a mountie. I mean it was like ridiculously done for Canada. Was Readen, you know, and so and it was just basically a romance. So I wanted to get it out fast. So I independently published it because that was the only way. And then we did a tour. Me and two other ladies got together and did a Canada one hundred and fifty tour across the provinces. We work with the libraries and we did ten stops across the provinces, one each weekend for ten weeks, and we got all the authors in the provinces and we'd had five or six and then we had a big finale in St John's, the capital, like what you were there, and we had like really authors came out and helped us because we did it for the library spring awareness, because the government was cutting funding to the libraries and we were like have that definitely. So we did that and I had the books. I saw ton of them because every place I went it was the Canada Book. So it was like it was this and then I put it on sale for Canada Day on the twenty four and I that's when it went best seller. So I mark I marked it down for Canada Day weekend and then I put it up to regular price and I guess because it was a Canada book, Amazon threw it right up at the top of everything and so even when the price went back up, people kept buying. So went into the paid best seller list for yeah, so it was a good marketing thing and I made some money and that was good. That was a romance. So I knew two things. You know, two people who are driving in a car across the country and it's happy ever after. That was pretty much it, right, and you get from this part to this part. Right, and they just veered off and did all this stuff and they weren't they didn't know each other when they left, and then they were adults. Say, you know, things happened. It was a tall building. They did the sky's neighbor, a mountain, but but theyven there has there were some serious things. The mountie had PTSD and she had gone through some things too. So she was and you brought in awareness to like indigenous people's issues. I touched on all of the topics of the day, as as what's true. Yeah, and then people called it a political book and I said, well, real life is political. Yeah, exactly. I don't know what, Carolyn, do you want to hang out with us while we wrap up, or do you do you want want to hang out? Yeah, okay, awesome. Know what you have to say. Well, I reread Panchecko, yes, by mention Lee. It's a historical fiction. It's excellent, excellent book. But Chenko, do you have this written...

...down somewhere? I'm gonna bug you ocause I don't. I don't have a pen. It's phenomenal. Will definitely put it on the show. Put on the okay, do that. Second time reading it. I recommended it to so many people and I've gotten everybody's really liked it. So I've looked for that. And it's historical fiction, so it's up your alley. Yet you know about Japan and Korea. That'd be really interesting. So it's different, you know. Yeah, like that and I really like that. And then I started reading. A coworker left me a booked or she gave it to a friend. Is like, because we don't work the same Scottish and make sure you give this to Leslie and she wrote a note on it's that you're gonna love this book. Oh yeah, and at the first couple pages just grabbed it's the nest. So I Cynthia Sweeney, and I I mean the first five pages I was like the hand of the villain type of thing, the hulk. I mean it was just like what five pages, excellent. I haven't finished it, but so far it's she was right. It's really good and she's a really good Abou. She's an a thriller drama. Okay, I like that. Yeah, yeah, what do you reading where might well, I am. I HAVE A to do list. I know I have not read Veris, but I have a huge list of books that I but on hold and my very just emailed me, so I get to go pick them up. So I've got under the Tuscan son I'm going to read. I love that book, that book, I mean that's one of my favorite books. In the movies cute to the book is move is cute so much also much better, and then the Car Dad sings. I'm gonna that one. So how about you, Carol, and do you have any books that you are currently reading? The last good book I read was called White Oleander. There's a movie by the same name. It is a fantastic well, it's got beautiful, beautiful, beautiful language, like it's so I can't even describe it. It's just the pros is so you just want to just lie down and go to sleep in and it's so rich. But the story is fantastic, like a first I was like, okay, is it going to be one of those is just going to be pros and pros, like I can do that. But after a while it's like too much sugar, you know what I mean? So I was really happy with it, but then I was like, okay, can't do this forever, because it needs to have some and it did. It jumped right into some it's a juicy, good story and but yet, like I said, it's a beautiful but dark it's like we talked about art taking the darkness of life and making it beautiful. That's, you know, wrapping it in this palatable package. That's kind of what it is. I read. I'm reading plays. I'm in a book club now that we are reading plays, and because so if someday I want to write a play, so they said read a lot of plays, and then there was a book club with plays. So that's a good way to make me do read a lot of places. I'm reading one a month and they're so short. They're just this big, like it's like I have the Book Club meeting that night, four o'clock, I sit down and read the play, you know what I mean? Like it's a totally different medium and that play is an hour and a half, two hours on stage. We get a lot of recommendations, put a lot of links. Yeah, we're going to have a library. Reason white only enders mine. Yeah, any last notes. Where can we find you? Where can our listeners find you? What can they find me? I'm all over social media, all the platforms. Carolyn our Parsons my books are on Amazon, of course, and through my publisher, flank of press. Yeah, so that's and I'm on Facebook, I've page and I have instagram and twitter and I'm everywhere linkedin. It's your first time listening to us and you have a question. We receive questions and we work them into our stories, into our shows.

However, if you have a specific question or you'd like to be on our podcast with us, your writer, we'd love to have you. So check us out at the writer's retreat podcastcom or if you're on twitter, we're on twitter, instagram, facebook. Yeah, we're buying out there. Yeah, find us. We're everywhere and we have listeners. Hello for all of our listeners. Yes, in Australia, Canada, what America? My publisher will be sharing your link around to the podcast when it publishes. So it'll it'll be all over. Okay, yeah, we'll be in Canada. Have a pretty good reach. That's that's fantastic because, like you said, you know the reason why you go to write retreat to hang out with other writers and have a good time, feel get reignited with your motivation and taught, you know, learn a few things, bounce like we've been bouncing ideas off each other. I learned a lot today. Yeah, thank you. Can I ask you one question? I know you're probably not doing your retreat retreat now. Retreat. Well, posed to be in Annapolis in September and we have to cancel it. N Yes, so you're going to do something to move it to two thousand and twenty one right, so stay tuned. So you will be having it again. Someday. I'm going to go be having it again, but you know, knows, maybe we'll have something else. I don't know what. Who knows? It always just it just looks so beautiful where you were and let's just let's go there. It's always so much fun to get together with other writers and talk writing and have time to write share our writing. Yeah, just you can't do that by yourself. I mean you can do it by yourself, but it's born, so it's to have more fun together. Yeah, he's Great. It was great having you on. Thank you and for anyone listening, thank you so much for joining us. Yeah, we're LEA MAC and Leslie Roads, and this is all. That is a crap. I love it. Thank you so much, Carolyn the yeah, yeah,.

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