007 - NaNoWriMo, here we come!
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The Writer's Retreat
The Writer's Retreat

Episode · 2 years ago

007 - NaNoWriMo, here we come!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Whether your a Panster or a Planner, or something inbetween, let's get ready to NaNoWriMo! Join our hosts in the new Writer's Retreat WRITING GROUP to help you gear up for November's National Novel Writing Month. And bring a writing buddy or two. It's about to get real! 

Hello and welcome to a podcast all about writing with writers, Leah Mac Leslie Roots. This is the writer's retreat. Hello, am welcome to the writer's retreat. Remember, you can ask all your writerly questions and find all our show notes out the writer's retreat podcastcom and you can also follow us on Instagram, twitter and Facebook, and now you can even join our new writing group on Patreon for writers just like you, and be sure to listen to the end of our show today so you can find out what we're reading in our book club. Okay, this is what happens when to writers try to do a podcast and we don't know what we're doing and we're learning technology wise. We don't know what we're technology wise, we don't know. Not that we don't know what we're doing, we're learning from our mistakes. Well, definitely making lots of mistakes and learning lots of stuff about technology, because I hope this works well. We can only hope for the best. You know, we can always drink. We can drink. What are you drinking today, Leslie? My normal I'm so boring. Were Boring, I said, I'm obviously drinking something good. Water on the rocks. HMM. I decided to go with a CABERNAE Savignon. Why? From Bodha box? I drink out of a box. Tell me I'm classy. You are. Lastly, one day will record this when I don't have to wake up at six am and go to your day job, go to my day job. Yes, I have been reading a lot lately. I saw that when I walked in today. I was I was like go Leah, I know, I am excited and I feel a lot more connected to just the writer's spirit, I guess, because I have been feeling really disconnected, and that's that's where I am right now. Yeah, tell me, very disconnected. Um, you know, maybe it's because, well, I guess the audience. You know that I can move on from Chapter Seven now. That's fantastic, but that's super scary. I think that that's what's got me all like, what do I do now? I've been in this one spot for so long that now I'm like, I don't know what to do. And why is it taking you so long for Chapter Seven? I mean, it's not like you're just pantsting. You're planning, planning a whole lot. I mean, yeah, planning takes a lot of work. I wrote my first book just Pant Sting it out and it's a different animal. It's a different beast for sure to plan everything because you have to sequester your creative side and say quiet for a while until you plan everything out logically. But I was just listening to a podcast where they said sometimes you just need to let your subconscious work it out. And Yeah, you have to go back and rewrite and rewrite, and so I'm not sure if just pantsting is the way to go. We're just planning is the way to go. Maybe like a combination of the both. I don't I don't know yet. Well, I actually spoke to one of our listeners this week, Oh really, I did, and and she loved your comment about that, that there's got to be a middle HMM. There's no just one way or the other. If there's got to be a middle ground both, because planning is awesome at it is, it is, like you just said, it also suppresses that amazing creative side that we have. That it's not necessarily a bad thing, and I think that that's what the listener was you know, really appreciated your comment about can we find a middle ground? We find a middle ground. I think, honestly, whatever works for you. If you are like extremely analytical, logically brained person, I think pantsting, not panting, sorry, planning, is the way to go, because you could plan all the way down to like the sentence structure if you wanted to. But for people who are extremely creative, I think are subconscious...

...does most of the work and maybe yeah, we'll have to go back and go back and go back, but that's the craft. It's a craft you have to I don't know. I don't know what the right answer is. I don't know, but I appreciate that call out from our listener and I was looking. I was with his or her name. Her name is Carlo Harla. Thank you so much for your comment and they'll gives us a lot to think about as we move into Nano Rhymo. Yeah, this is a great segue into that. Yeah, like next month is November and for anyone listening and doesn't know what Nana Rymo is, it is national novel writing month. It's like the best month of the year. Have you ever done it before? I have. I have done it a couple times and I've never come through to the end with Fiftyzero words written. But I have started projects and left them to the Nano rymo world. I've worked on waiting for paint to dry while I was doing Nana Raymo. But it's it's a really free experience, especially if you're a planner or you're trying to plan and you've lost touch with that creative side of yourself, to just write. You don't go back, you don't plan. I mean you might have an idea in your head of where you're going to go for the day or where you want to end up at the end of the month, but you just sit down every day and you write, hopefully a thousand words or more a day. No, you'd have to write more than I thou what did I figure out on? Sixteen hundred, one thousand six hundred. Go with two thousand words a day. Yeah, well, let's like gets the calculator. I can get my fan. But yeah, the point is to write fiftyzero words in a month and that would be I mean taking out a couple days here and therefore thanksgiving a whatnot, about two thousand words a day, which is not too hard to get down. And of course the majority of what you write's going to be probably edited, you know, out, but you'll be able to get to flow an idea out of your head. I think it's a great I've done it before. I've never finished through with it, but well, at during that time period when I tried, I mean I think I had two kids breastfeeding and a kid, another kid hanging on my leg. So you know how that goes. Right, a few things in right, just like yeah, just a little bit. But I think if you're trying to get into writing, this is a great way to get pumped. There's so many people doing it with you. Join a group. There's if you're stuck, this is a great way to get unstuck. If you need to just dump vomit, vomit by word vomit. Yes, where vomit, go for it. I really am looking forward to it. I'm definitely going to do it. Oh, so you're going to do I am. I am I am because I think I need to wear dump some stuff and I need to have I've never been really good with rules or boundaries or stuff, so I really want to go with go with this without any planning, no structure, nothing. I just want to take whatever is am my idea, my head and just righte. I just want to I just want to be wild. I want to be like the wolves who I like that. Yeah, and just have like a word count a day that you want to hit. Yeah, yeah, I'm you know, I have to be transparent. You know, my life is really crazy. I have for kids thirteen and under. I work on the weekends. I've got them all e learning. I mean, I've got a plethora of things going yeah, there's a pandemic. Yeah, there's a pandemic. I'm at home. I there's a lot going on. So I want to go in saying I'M gonna my goal is just to...

...sit down and write. I'm not going to give myself a word count, I'm not going to give myself a time just I'm going to honor. I'm going to really work on not necessarily motivation, but developing what's the word I'm looking for here? Like a consistent routine, routine, you know, because it's really writing a book isn't about motivation. No, you either want to write one or you don't. Yeah, I mean, motivation comes and goes. Right. It's basically creating that habit, that consistency, that every day and I think that's my goal from November. That's a good goal to hits it because once I think that's the best way to develop your voice. Also, yeah, if you're a new writer. I just have to be realistic with my life and the things that I have going on. And it's November, which is a month before the holidays, but these holidays are going to be a little different. I mean, it's not like we're all going places. My mother called my had a conversation with my mother this week and she said, just want to let you know that we're not having thanks govind everybody's doing their own thing, and I already knew that right. Obviously I know that I mean, but it really hit home. I was just like, we're not having your mom's like you have all people. You know, right, I know, I just it doesn't seem real. I know this is we're gonna all have. I don't know if I think we're just going to do fun. We're not even going to do Turkey, like put some point for four people, like true, just gonna make some fun, for sure. Yea, I know, members a great month. November is also my birthday month. Oh, happy birthday. So I think it's a great way to write. You know. Are you going to participate? I am, I am. I decided I'm going to for the month put my well, I'm planning a lot of the remainder of my sequel right now, and so it's taking a lot of non creative juices. It's just all logical, trying to plan and out the last thirtyzero words so that I can fit the rest of the the plot in and make sure everything ties up with a nice little bow. And so my creative side is like just it's having withdrawals. So I need to I'm excited for Nana Ramos so I can maybe start a new project, something that I'm going to work on after the sequel is done. But get that creative side of myself and just be able, like you said, every day sit down right and just let it just barf out like that's how I envision or that's how I look at first, first drafts of a manuscript. It's just just puke those words out. Don't go back, don't edit, don't worry about the structure. Don't worry. You know they're all your darlings. Everything that comes out you're going to love hate. Who Cares? Just keep going, just keep writing. Get those words in, and I hope to at the end of the month I'll have that fiftyzero words and I'll be able to say, dude, I did it. It's all garbage, or is at least a nice loose outline of what I want to do at just get the ideas out, because I have, I've talked about it before, my Colorado Book. I'm not able to go to Colorado and get a good sense. I mean I used to live there in Colorado. Springs go rockies, but and I know what it feels like to be thereby I needed, I wanted to go back for research. So I think maybe this will be a good, good segue into, you know, getting back into that mode, that creative mode, get my Colorado book out and then when we're able to travel again, I'll be able to go out there and just fill in the gaps. I love it. So it's one thousand six hundred and sixty six words. That's every day. That's that's really easy to do.

You're honestly. It comes tendonitis. Honestly, I don't feel any pain when I write. My thumb has been giving me troubles. Your thumbs, my thumbs stop hitchhiking. Yeah, yeah, well, maybe you could get a voice to chat. Yeah, order, that would be good. Now, suck it up, I can do it. You could do it. Yeah, just one. Sixteen hundred words a day, not bad, bad, yea coffee, coffee, Sun Rising speaking. The House is quiet. Yeah, yeah, let's so, since we're both doing Nana Rymo next month, in about a week or so, all right, other people can join us. You know, I thought about that and I set something up on Anna Ramo, a writing group. It's totally free, unlike our patreon group, where you know you'll be you you get to have a monthly critique of your writing by a published author me. So, I mean, if you wanted to join in on our our patreon writing group, you just go to Patreon and find us there. Go to writers retreat podcastcom find a link to our patreon writing group. But for Nana Raymo, we're having a special writing group just for Nana remos, Nana remes IMIS later I'ms are a Naimes, and so that, you know, we can just kind of hold each other accountable and just cheer lead each other on. Like, Dude, you wrote five thousand words today. That's going to motivate me or that's going to help someone else say, okay, I can sit down and write. I don't need to watch another episode of the office. I've only watched it five thousand times. But yeah, we can get together and you get to know us a little bit more on a personal level, I guess. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, join us on Nana reymos website. We have our writing group there. Friend us. If you can't find us, just shoot me a quick, you know, comment on our website at the writer's retreat podcastcom will find you and I'll be a great way to I don't know, I just want to meet other people. We have just our small group. Yeah, our writing group is kind of dwindling in activity and I've been looking forward to start guarding a new writing grus because it it is solitary should be a writer, but it's not solitary when you build your community and you have a writing community that you can go to and say just talk writing stuff, like we are here at the right of retreat, Yep, just kind of talk about it will be nice. Yes, I think our group is just gotten quiet. Is just so much going on. Yeah, I pandemic. Who knows? Yeah, I mean people are just all stressed out and everybody's mental health has just gone to shit. So, yes, yes, and I have been beating myself up actually lately that I haven't been out running and biking and I can't even go swimming because the the pool is closed. So excited, I trained for trathlons, but it just went for a walk yesterday and I thought that, you know, it was just for my mental health, just get out of the house, do something in some guy had to bother me while I was walking. He stopped his car and Insta long next to me on the trail and bothered me. Yeah, really, like, don't people understand that you're making others uncomfortable with your quote unquote, flattery? Like seriously, well, I went far UN yesterday. Could for not a run, I ran walk. I am not a runner. I don't like I'm not...

...just I'm not. I'm a sprinter. That's what I am. Not just not a long like let's go. But I needed to run out and just I told the kids, I was like, Dude, just sit here for like thirty minutes. You guys got it. Mom's just gotta release. And I did. I felt so good. It's good for your mental health. Yeah, yeah, I'd usually do like pilate's during the week and I always get my like tenzero steps going on and stuff. I feel like I'm pretty active, but I needed to I needed to run. What did they have anything to do with writing? There was it? Just no, it's just, you know, I just had this pent up energy and just like I needed to just get it out. I did think about the book. Yeah, you know, and my kids like to remind me the first thing that river told me this. This was it yesterday, I think it was yesterday morning, because I love you. I love you like you love Wolf River, and I looked im was like, I don't like it right now. It's like it's okay, mom. You know, I was listening to a podcast where, sorry, the writer, he's published over twenty bucks and he's lamented the same exact types of things that we lament. How we love our story then we hate it and there were struggling against it and it's torturing as that we tried to torture and he was saying the same exact things after twenty books that we say now. What does that mean? Does that mean that we have to be accustomed to the type of struggles that we in interact with as writers. or I mean, are we never going to overcome these types of things? Are we always going to feel like we're struggling against, you know, trying to get up work out if you're a panstor, or struggling against plotting and not being creative if your plotter like he had the same woes after twenty bucks. I've heard that a lot. So I think it's just part of it. So it's acceptance that this is the way it's going to be. Or you can accept and be like, okay, I can accept this, but I can yeah, this kind of stinks. We're going to have this emotional roller coaster going around with our books, and we can just change our mindset to a growth mindset. Leslie do tell just looking at it from a different angle, you know, just having a different say. Okay, this sucks right now and this is this is really hard and it I don't like how this is making me feel, because it's bringing up emotions, bringing up frustration, it's bring up anger, it's bringing up tears. You know, I just want to give my book the finger, you know, but this is really just sitting with ugly and just be like, okay, this is making me feel like this, but emotions come and go. Emotions come and go, you know. So we're just like, okay, this is this sucks, but I can keep doing this, I know, trucking along right. And that was another thing that I listened to a lot of different podcasts on writing and someone else had mentioned. He said the same exact thing that you just said. Yeah, it just it's part of it. It's part of the journey of writing and you have two choices ei there, except that this is the way it is, or you quit. Yes, and they also said, I remember now, that when you're digging deep into yourself, it's a gift that you're giving other people so that when they're reading your writing, they're able to process different emotions that they're going through. Now it does. Yeah, wow, so deep. It was very deep, and it was like this is why writing sometimes is a pain, because we're putting so much of ourselves and out there that it's a gift to other people...

...who can't string the words together to kind of make sense of what they're feeling. Wow, because everyone has a gift, like some people can put their feelings into music, some people can put their feelings into art. Some people can put their feelings into fixing your freaking carburetor. But you know, as writers, you have a gift of put it, stringing words together in a way that helps other people make sense of this crazy thing that we call life. Every word is like a brush stroke, right, playing chemists, and so, you know, every book is just piece of art and how we, each person, translates it, I think, is the gift that you're giving that person. Absolutely, you know, and the way that your readers interpret it is another gift because sometimes, like with my first book, people interpreted and took it in a different way than I meant it. But it was a gift because there's every you can't control how someone's going to interpret things, and it's a good thing because they bring more colors, like you said, to the to the painting. It's like, Oh, I never thought of it that way. I maybe my subconscious was putting it together even and I think that's part of it, even though sometimes we look at our painting and it looks just like we're painting it black, you know, because we go through those lows, right, but really it's just a different shade, you know, on it's just picking up the brush again, dipping it into it and just the whole the hardest part is starting. The hardest part is putting the paint brush to the canvas, and that's what Nanna Raimo right is good for. Is a good way to start. You might scrap all fiftyzero words as you write, but it's going to help you build the outline or whatever it is. You know the idea. It's building that muscle. Let you. My daughter is extremely talented artist at the age of nine, extremely talented for being the nine year old. She's always just had this gift of painting, drawing, whatever she just said. She was really little. She takes art classes here locally where we live, and the guy who our teacher is an amazing cartoon and I mean he's just Badass me. And he said something to me that's kind of stuck with me all week. And he said, you know, how can you expect to be an artist if you're not going to practice every day? This is true? Is it really this? Like I felt like he was the universe coming down and sending me a message. Be Like Leslie. There you go. It is true. HMM. And he said he told me a story about you know, when he was a kid, he'd go to his friend's house and bring his stack of comic books, lay it front and for hours, until it was dinner time, he they would just practice and practice, and at first he didn't know. He was just like coppying from the comic book and coming and just like practice and brand. Every day after school and they were done with their homework, they'd go to the each other's houses and doing that and until one day he didn't need the comic books anymore. One day it just came to him. One day he was now going from like racing it all to now he's like coloring it in and on the first time it's just like looked like an amazing and since from those young days of practicing every day, he's made art his passionate's career. He's had, he said, he's had every art job you can possibly think of, and his daughter goes and Co teaches, kind of sits with them while they're there, and she's just talented and it's the whole. You know, he's aid like look her, she's gotten this good because every day she's putting a pencil to paper. The same thing for writing,...

...same thing you cannot expect to be a I'm note to self, Leslie, you cannot expect yourself to be a writer or improve if you're not going to put the time and effort into it. And it's like I tell my kids, it's like you're not born knowing how to do things. You don't. You know, just like a baby. You baby's how it look all they learn how to walk, right, you might have an inclination. Yeah, sord something right like Oh, she really puts words together really well. I wonder if she'll be a writer. But not great. But not everybody, I mean not everybody's born with that gift, but they can improve and become better if they practice every day, every day, and that's what Nana Ramo is good for, is that everyday practice, stretching or toning that muscle, that writing muscle. Yeah, who was it? Was it Michael Jordan? You guys can leave us some. I think it was Michael Jordan. That wasn't very well good and he just every I don't know what it's it was. It's a famous basketball player, that which is I think it was Michael Jordan, which is not as good. Every day. It was right good at all. It was just nut, but he was determined, HMM, and he was willing to make those mistakes to get better, because that's the only way you're going to learn in this life is mistakes, mistake after mistake after mistake after mistake as a mistake, and that we have to get over the fact that mistakes are this bad thing right. That's just so important. It's like a big thing in my house is I pay my kids a pending for every time they make a mistakes. It's really important to me. It's just your first chance of learning, or seconds or you know. Now I say this out loud, but and I'm really trying to her to tell myself that, you know, mmm, that sticks for good, because that's how you learn. MMMMM M. and I feel like I'm plotting the second half, not even the second half, the the last the or last fourth of my book and I just feel like I know where I want to end up, but it's like I don't want it to be two books. I wanted just to fit it in there and I'm working with a writing coach and so trying to plot the way that my coach likes to plot is going against every way that I know how to write. And so I've finally, after months of struggling against this coach, I've turned. I realized this coach wants me to turn off my creative side and just look at things logically. Okay, so I look at things logically and there they look totally different, and now I'm seeing how to plan out the rest of my book. I wonder if I'll be able to turn my creat a sideback on. Like it's so black and white. I feel like I'm married to an engineer and I know what logical looks like. It's not creative at all. Like I couldn't do half the things that my husband does. But like I'm afraid, but also, like my book coach, can see the end also, so I have to have to put some faith into what this person is saying, but also heart. You we yeah, you're listening. I hope my book coach is not listening. I know he's listening. I just I hope that I'm able to accomplish what I have been trying to accomplish. But every day I doubt myself that I'll ever finish. But that's just being a writer. You have to have that self doubt that you have to tackle every day. I don't know why we have to have it. No, is that that we have to have it. We just have it. I think the writing coach see is...

...able to see the bigger picture and has more faith, and it's like a project manager. There's for faith in us, then we think that we have in ourselves. So I think that the way that this writing coach does things is to give us a backbone. So I for many, many, for a long time, I'm called our writing coach, Mr Miyagi, for obvious reasons, because his techniques are very different, and you just like, why am I doing this, and then till later on you realize that, yes, you're right, painting defense does work. Waxing on and off. Yes, yeah, it's just hard to accept when you're in the the in it the torture phrase. Oh yeah, he tortures me. So for Nana Rymo, what are you going to be working on? I have some ideas. It's going to be all humans, promise, no more. No animasimal know it forced animals in this definitely going to be the lead characters. Going to be a female. I think that the theme is going to be a pretty strong probably a survivor theme. I think definitely gonna be start here in the US and end up somewhere else. That's going to be an adventure type of deal. A lot of action, some violence. I think. Where do you hope to like start in the beginning of the month and then stop at the end? I couldn't mean like what are you going to be writing? Like, where are they going to start? Oh, she's going to start in the streets of DC. MM, she is. I've got two stories that could kind of go. I don't know. I haven't decided which. They're both going to start in the streets of DC. MMM. I just don't know. I've got two stories in my head. I think you read one of them long time. You just probably maybe don't want remember the red like a rough, rough place. You're not certain which story you're going to write for Nana. Mymouth now I know. I just know. Those things going to be a female. It's going to be the lead survivor, type survivor, type of healing survivor, or like a apocalypse survivor not apocalypse, probably either. It's probably going to be like a battered wife. Battered, yeah, spousal abuse type of deal. Yeah, I'm thinking of kind of like the movie sleeping with the enemy. Yeah, type of do. You'll need lots of chocolate. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's going to be hard to start your morning off that way, but no, it'll be. It'll be exciting to start your day off that way. Like, how how are you going to work in your time to write, since your life is so crazy busy, packed extremely full? The five am, five agm deal and enjoin the Five Am Writers. Yeah, I unders. That's the only way I have. You know, the most important thing I've got to do in the morning is at my meditation, my t ceremony, my Cheekong, and then I can accomplish then I'll sit down and I'll write, probably until the kids way up. I don't know where I'm going to fit in my working out, but somewhere and there throughout the day I might work out somewhere. You know, we need just a couple more hours to our day.

Yeah, yeah, because you know, I don't after the kids wake up. There's no quiet time until they go to bed. None. What's there's no right. None. What about you? What's your plan? Would Oh, well, wait, your oh no, you said you're going to write about the Colorado. The Colorado Book Yeah, I'm gonna wake up five am. I'll be right there with you. Well, you know, we can text each other. Yeah, in our little ride and group, right Mo, say hey, good morning, five am writers. That's a good way. Yeah, that's good. Yep, some accountability. If you don't respond, you're not awake. Are you writing? Silence? That means that you're not awake. I can't stay up and watch my show now, but if you can, you can record your show watch it later. Which show is us? Homeland? Homeland? Is that a like a government CIA? See, I like that stuff. M So are you going to do five am? Hollow, many hours you're going to write? Let's see, I five am. I'll probably write in Gosh, I'M gonna have to make my espresso in the morning, get moving and the sun. When is the sun ever? It's like it's just the winter around here in Maryland, like doesn't write rise. I think I'll write for one to two hours and then go for a run and then come back and then start my day job. Yeah, that's so. Are you going to are you're going to try to do on th sixteen hundred? Correct. I'm gonna just write until my time is up and then we'll see you how much I can get accomplished in our or if I go for two, I might break it up like an hour reading to wake up and then hour to write. I don't know that's a good idea. I usually read at night, but reading, maybe reading before might be a good primer. It's started. I don't know. I was searching for a book that was similar to mine to read, but I have not found anything like it. So I just started reading things that actually like to read and I'm well, we haven't gotten to our book club segment yet. Yes, but I've been reading a lot. You have in the past week and it feels really good. It feels like it's stirring up my creative side again and I'm kind of feel coexisting my creative side and my planet, my logical side. So it's new. I don't know, I feel like I'm making any sense. You are high flute and stuff. Now I feel like, just to get the juices flowing, read a little bit, but I get bored of I had to admit this to my brother. I was like, I didn't like reading until halfway through college, really because of my dyslexia. I remember the first chant of times that I got to read. Like when I was learning to read, my teachers would hit me on the hands because I wasn't doing it right, because I was trying to, you know, cover up the letters so they wouldn't blend together, and it snack me. It's like game, Michigan Teachers, Michigan Teachers. Oh, no, long time ago. So I guess I just had a bad taste for reading to begin with. Plus all the words were just mixing together all the time. Sense. Yeah, but then halfway through college I got to pick the classes I was taking and I enjoyed what I was reading and then all of a...

...sudden I was just I really started enjoying it. So I been catching up ever since, kind of because I like all the things that you read in high school. I don't remember reading. I don't remember are either. No, reading is just like the best thing for me. I love it. It's so therapeutic. Every time I go to your house, you have piles of books. Yes, piles of books. I'm in the stairs next to the window, in the kitchen, next my I mean I've got a gazillion books going on. I just I love, Love, love reading. Well, maybe this would be a good segue into our next segment. So you've been reading a lot. What are you reading? Well, right now I'm reading bear town. Ah, yes, I love that book. I think you suggested. Yes, I love that book. That's a great book. Haven't gotten too far into it, but I'm excited because it's all about hockey. Yes, it's so good. It's really good book. And then you have to read Miss What is? Oh? A man named Oh. Yes, I read, read that one after heard that's funny. It's good, but the bear town is not fun mare town, it's not funny and I think the same all to that one. Sorry, I don't know, but let's started this book club for the writer's retreat. And so that's what I'm reading. Yes, is the bear town. Bear town is really good. I highly recommended. Will put the link to the show notes in the show notes in there. Yeah, I am still not do much reading this week. A little crazy this week. So I'm still wrapping up the nest. I should be done with it. Yeah, I'm gonna have to read that next. That one's good so far, but it's been I've been not that the book has been slow, is just by the time I get to bed I read like a sentence and I'm like, and I've been staying up watching homeline. Guys, I'm going to be honest. It's okay. I mean when you're watching a show, are you dissecting? Yes, I am writing. I am dissecting the writing, and I'm yelling at my husbands say did you see that? Did you see how great that writer would they took that book that started, that picture of her and her daughter, and look look what's happening at the end. I mean little things like that. You can see the good writing after for not good without good road. I can see the right, good writing. I mean, like I said, I Love I love bringing down movie. So yeah, that. I try to turn it off because I my husband says I'm not enjoying the show because I'm so busy. Like yeah, like that's I tell that's going to be important. Don't forget, don't forget what he just did, because I guarantee you it's going to show up later on. Butts, let's see, that's another way of flexing the muscle, the writing muscle, and learning the craft of writing, because you're dissecting other people's work and you're realizing, okay, that that prop or whatever it is that or that they said, that little nugget of information is going to be important later on, and so you're internalizing that, you're working your muscle soul so that when you work on your own story, you're like, I need to lay a trap or I need to set set something up here and leave a little negget of information that later is going to be pertinent. And this is really good to know, because nothing, like our writing coach tells us, everything in a movie cost lots of money, so it cannot just be there for no reason. There is a point to it because it's cost money. Right, and a book, though, you have room, don't you? Yeah, you have room, but but it's a good way to say that what you right also needs to kind of it's not going to be there for no reason, right. You can't just have a nice flower flowery sentence that has no point to it, or a character that just what. Yeah, yeah, some characters. When you get to the end of the book you read through your like what was the point?...

What's the point of this person? Cut Pine, Corner Acorn? You're working with animals in a forest. Pine cones and ACORNS are very important. Yes, the difference people. Yes, well, if you want to listen, I'll follow along with our book club. You know, those are two choices of the this show. They're both really good, so we'll put the links in the show notes. Yeah, the show notes again, they're at the right of the treat podcastcom any last notes? Last notes. I want to make sure that people know about our new writing group on Patreon, because being part of a writing group really helps you a not feel alone be you get to know bounce ideas off of each other. But see, it's like coming to work every day. Like I look at my writing as though it's my job and I like to have other people that I commiserate with and just hang out with at the the water cooler. And so our patreon writers that join the Writing Group, you know, discuss genre stuff or publishing stuff, marketing stuff as well as the writing, because it all goes together. It's a lot of work. It's a lot of work because it's great to have a group of writers that you can do it with. And maybe I'll pop in there once in a while and say hello. I know a lot of people in the writing realm, so I know editors in all the sorts of things, so if you have. Whenever, when you get to that point in your writing, I know who to recommend you to. So joying. Yeah, at Patreoncom. We're there, all right. Well, thank you so much for joining us. Yeah, and until next time. That's wrap. Let's wrap, but make sure you join us on an Ramo. Oh, yes, I will put a link to that too. So join our group. Yeah,.

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